Boldly Stepping Up to the Conservation Challenges Ahead

Partnerships are the lifeblood of the Intermountain West Joint Venture.

Working With Our Neighbors: The Intermountain West Joint Venture (IWJV) is working to communicate how the most effective large-landscape conservation efforts involve voluntary, collaborative approaches across jurisdictional boundaries and scales. This is achieved through championing working lands conservation that embraces livelihoods, the economic vitality of rural communities, and healthy wildlife populations.

We believe building trust and credibility through public-private partnerships are the cornerstones to sustaining conservation efforts for generations to come.

IWJV has built a solid foundation for the delivery of coordinated habitat conservation by assembling strong and diverse public-private partnerships. We work hand-in-hand with programs and initiatives that benefit birds and other wildlife, ranching, industry, tribes, outdoor recreation, and the economic livelihoods of western communities. We help partners build capacity, apply science, and leverage funding to achieve conservation at landscape scales across the Intermountain West.

Water and Wetlands

 

Wet meadows on irrigated agricultural lands comprise 62 percent of the wetland habitat in snowpack-driven systems of the Intermountain West. These lands provide vital habitat for migratory birds, sustain floodplain function, and recharge aquifers, but are at risk of fragmentation from rural subdivision, competing water demands, and the ongoing impacts of climate change.

Sagebrush Rangelands


 

Millions of acres of sagebrush rangelands are vulnerable to catastrophic wildfire, annual invasives like cheatgrass, and conifer encroachment—exacerbated by the impacts of climate change. Sagebrush occupies less than 60 percent of its historical extent and several sagebrush obligate species have been petitioned for Endangered Species Act listing.

Partnership-Based Conservation

The most effective large-landscape scale conservation efforts involve voluntary, collaborative approaches across jurisdictional boundaries and scales through working lands conservation that embraces livelihoods, the economic vitality of rural communities, and healthy wildlife populations.

In the Intermountain West, shifting air and stream temperatures, precipitation, reduced snowpack, and changes in peak runoff and flows will impact water management, and fish and irrigation efforts will become more complicated. Similarly, in associated rangelands and forests, increased drought in summer will increase the likelihood of wildfire frequency and invasive species will be favored by changes in wildfire regimes. 

We believe the following will be pivotal to durable conservation in the West: 

Resources & Fact Sheets